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Debris at Beirut’s port after the explosion on August 4. Credit: Hannah McKay/Reuters

by OCCRP and Partners

21 August 2020

The explosives factory that was meant to receive the Rhosus’ cargo also shares an address with ExploAfrica, a company co-owned by the Vieira family. Confidential corporate and government documents shared by the Conflict Awareness Project, a U.S.-based nonprofit, show that ExploAfrica and its affiliates were investigated by South African and Portuguese authorities for obtaining U.S. and Czech weapons that later ended up in the hands of rhino and elephant poachers in South Africa’s Kruger National Parks on the border with Mozambique. Read the Article Here

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Česká zbrojovka je v Mosambiku jedničkou. Pytláci nosorožců ji zbožňují. (Česká zbrojovka is number one in Mozambique. Rhino poachers adore her.)

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June 24, 2018

From left, a rifle with a silencer confiscated from a poacher, rhino horns seized from poachers being burnt in Mozambique, and a rhino’s head from which the horn has been hacked off. Pictures courtesy of Carte Blanche and TBG Archive

In September 2014, I travelled to an air force base on the outskirts of Pretoria to attend the biennial Africa Aerospace and Defence expo, Africa’s biggest arms show and South Africa’s top-grossing event. A side theme of the arms trade fair was antipoaching efforts. I was there first to see for myself the cutting-edge weaponry and technology that was being marketed by the world’s leading arms companies for use in Africa’s so-called “poaching wars”, and second, to meet rhino protectors serving on the frontlines so I could learn about the poachers’ guns.

As I made my way through hangar-sized exhibition halls and cavernou...

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