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Debris at Beirut’s port after the explosion on August 4. Credit: Hannah McKay/Reuters

by OCCRP and Partners

21 August 2020

The explosives factory that was meant to receive the Rhosus’ cargo also shares an address with ExploAfrica, a company co-owned by the Vieira family. Confidential corporate and government documents shared by the Conflict Awareness Project, a U.S.-based nonprofit, show that ExploAfrica and its affiliates were investigated by South African and Portuguese authorities for obtaining U.S. and Czech weapons that later ended up in the hands of rhino and elephant poachers in South Africa’s Kruger National Parks on the border with Mozambique. Read the Article Here

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Česká zbrojovka je v Mosambiku jedničkou. Pytláci nosorožců ji zbožňují. (Česká zbrojovka is number one in Mozambique. Rhino poachers adore her.)

July 2, 2019

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August 20, 2012

Originally published in The At War blog. The blog typically catches up with black-market arms when they are already in use, as they are in Syria and Libya. We’ve also reported on weapons deals before they become the implements of revolution.

Kathi Lynn Austin is a former United Nations weapons inspector. She is also the executive director of the Conflict Awareness Project, an advocacy group that she founded, “dedicated to investigating, documenting and bringing to justice major arms traffickers, war profiteers, and transnational criminal networks that fuel conflict around the globe.” The views given here are Ms. Austin’s alone, but we have asked Ms. Austin to contribute because as a trafficking expert she can help tease out the ways illegal arms traffic is sustained. — At War

So, you’d like to set up an illegal weapons network in the post-Sept.11 e...

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